Wisconsin Humane Society opens doors to first high-volume spay/neuter clinic in Southeastern Wisconsin

spay neuter clinicThe Wisconsin Humane Society (WHS) is excited to be opening the doors of the Wisconsin Humane Society Spay/Neuter Clinic on Monday, June 1, 2015 with a special ribbon-cutting ceremony at 10:00 a.m. The new clinic is located at 9400 W. Lincoln Avenue in West Allis.

What: Ribbon-cutting at WHS Spay/Neuter Clinic; after the ribbon-cutting, tour behind-the-scenes and see surgeries in action.
Where: 9400 W. Lincoln (corner of Lincoln & National)
When: 10:00 a.m. Monday, June 1, 2015
Who: President & CEO Anne Reed; WHS board and staff; Dr. Arvind Ahuja, and other supporters who made it possible

Milwaukee has been one of the only major metropolitan communities with no high-volume spay/neuter clinic, and there is substantial need for this resource. WHS has offered the Spay Neuter Assistance Program (SNAP) for more than a decade, but clients have had to wait several months to get an appointment due to high demand and limited staff and surgical space.

The focus of the new clinic will be to provide high-quality, affordable spay/neuter surgery to the general public, with a special focus on animals living in underserved areas. The goal for the first year of operation is to perform 6,000 surgeries, and by year three of operation, WHS will be able to perform 14,000 surgeries.

“We are convinced that this is the single program with the highest potential to save animals in our region,” said Anne Reed, president and CEO of WHS. “Animal overpopulation has fallen in many areas of Milwaukee and the United States, but remains a serious issue in local communities that lack resources, some of which have a spay/neuter rate of just 9%.”

About spay/neuter
Spaying or neutering cats and dogs reduces animal overpopulation and animal homelessness. It can also reduce some behavior issues and decreases the desire of animals to roam. In addition, altered animals live longer than their unaltered counterparts, and are protected from certain types of cancer.

Make an appointment
Appointments can be made online at wihumane.org/clinic or by calling (414) 323-6163. Fees range from $75 for a cat spay/neuter to $105 for a dog spay/neuter; the fee includes a pre-surgical exam, spay/neuter surgery, pain medication, and complimentary nail trim. Vaccinations and microchipping are also available during the spay/neuter appointment. See website for full pricing and services.

The Wisconsin Humane Society (WHS) is the oldest and largest shelter in Wisconsin. It was founded in 1879 and operates shelters in Milwaukee, Ozaukee and Racine Counties, as well as a high-volume spay/neuter clinic in West Allis. The organization offers adoption services, educational programming, veterinary resources for animals from low-income households, retail stores, volunteer programs and dog training classes. The Milwaukee shelter also houses the state’s largest Wildlife Rehabilitation Center.